Synthetic Birth Control

Birth control is something that we get asked about a LOT. We get questions ranging from girls wanting to know how it works to how it doesn’t.


How you choose to regulate your body is your choice and we support your freedom in whatever you decide is best for you. If you decide you must use or continue using a medical form of birth control, we simply want to make sure that you are fully aware of all of the side effects. Often times, with flashy advertising coupled with pharmaceutical backing, we are not made aware of some of the more harmful repercussions that certain products can have on our bodies. Additionally, the use of medical birth control can make tracking your Inner Seasons more challenging, being that the various forms of birth control are artificially adjusting the levels of your hormones. With that being said, awareness brings the ability to make well educated and beneficial decisions for ourselves and since this information is not widely available, we felt that it is noteworthy enough to mention some of side effects that medical birth control can have on our bodies.


Toward the end of 2018, an official recommendation was released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, that intrauterine devices (IUDs) should be used as the first line of contraceptive to prevent unplanned pregnancies. IUDs can contain copper or a synthetic form of the hormone progesterone and they work by doing X, Y, and Z. ADD SENTENCES HERE about how IUDs can have an unbeneficial effect on the body even when they’re working perfectly. Then give with a common side effect that is not terrible but explain how that side effect happens, then add a sentence about how MORE and MORE CASES are COMING OUT showing IUDs are causing SERIOUS complications. THEN end with a sentence about how they may not be the great thing they’ve been advertised as.) Generally people know about the most common side effects of using an IUD which are: increased menstrual bleeding, cramps, and spotting between menstrual periods. However, there are more serious side effects that people are not aware of, including:

Risk of infection in the fallopian tubes

Risk of pelvic inflammatory disease, which can lead to infertility

Risk of the IUD embedding in the uterine wall

Damage to the uterus and potential damage to other organs

Risk of internal bleeding

Lawsuits have been forming gradually over the years against IUD makers for misleading the public. Nearly 500 cases have been filed against (1) Bayer Pharmaceuticals (who make the IUD, named Mirena) alleging they purposefully mislead accusing them of misleading the public.


By purposefully avoiding to reveal dangerous side effects, such as the risk of perforation of the uterus and/or the device migrating to another location in the body. The lawsuits accuse the company of selling a dangerous product and. They also claim the company used deceptive advertising and hid the risk of complications. Generally people are made aware of the most common side effects which are: increased menstrual bleeding, cramps, and spotting between menstrual periods. However, there are very serious side effects that are much less mentioned which include:

Risk of infection in the fallopian tubes

Risk of pelvic inflammatory disease, which can lead to infertility

Risk of the IUD embedding in the uterine wall

Damage to the uterus and potential damage to other organs

Risk of internal bleeding


When it comes to oral contraceptives, there are many case studies that show just as many unsettling risks of use. he longer a woman uses oral contraceptives the higher the risk of certain cancers. According to the National Cancer Institute, one study showcasing the risk of cervical cancer a 10% increased risk for less than 5 years of use of the pill, a 60% increased risk with 5–9 years of use and a doubling of the risk with 10 or more years of use (2). However, fortunately the risk of cervical cancer was also found to decline over time after women stop using oral contraceptives (3-5)

Even though most people are made aware of the possible short-term side effects that oral birth control can have such as: bleeding between periods, headaches, nausea, breast tenderness, weight gain and mood swings, still most of women are not made aware of the fact that birth control is linked to causing liver tumors, blood clots, stroke, endometriosis and even creating stronger more painful menstrual flows if you do decide to get off the pill. These are just the physical side effects and do not include the emotional, psychological effects which can include mental depression and increased mood swings.

We don't know about you, but we feel that being a human, already comes with enough challenges so increasing the chances of having constant mood swings or feeling depressed, is not something we wish to enhance. Whether it be pills, shots or implants, if you decide to continue using any of these forms of birth control, at least now you can at least have a higher awareness of the potential side effects and dangers.

If you have decided to go the all natural route--and you have been using birth control for a while, it may take your body a little bit of time to become regular again. Fortunately if you are experiencing any of these post birth control symptoms, as mentioned in Inner Winter, there are steps you can take that will speed up the process and bring your body back into a natural equilibrium. Resources: 1. Drugwatch.com; Michelle Llamas; Medically reviewed by Dr. John A. Daller, American Board of Surgery

2. Smith JS, Green J, Berrington de Gonzalez A, et al. Cervical cancer and use of hormonal contraceptives: a systematic review. Lancet 2003; 361(9364):1159-1167.

3. International Collaboration of Epidemiological Studies of Cervical Cancer, Appleby P, Beral V, et al. Cervical cancer and hormonal contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of individual data for 16,573 women with cervical cancer and 35,509 women without cervical cancer from 24 epidemiological studies. Lancet 2007; 370(9599):1609–1621.

4. Roura E, Travier N, Waterboer T, et al. The influence of hormonal factors on the risk of developing cervical cancer and pre-cancer: Results from the EPIC Cohort. PLoS One2016; 11(1):e0147029.

5. Iversen L, Sivasubramaniam S, Lee AJ, Fielding S, Hannaford PC. Lifetime cancer risk and combined oral contraceptives: The Royal College of General Practitioners' Oral Contraception Study. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2017; 216(6):580.e1-580.e9. According to the Pregnancy Health Clinic, having a IUD

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